Projects

Little River Landcare has successfully delivered $10 million worth of projects since 1998 and interacted with thousands of land managers. LRLG recent projects are listed below. 

Soils PET (People, Education, Technology) Pilot Project

Current Project

Expressions of interest now open!

The Soils PET Pilot Project is an innovative pilot to test mechanisms of engagement and information transfer. The project utilises on-ground connectivity of Landcare networks to stimulate change in management of landscapes in Central West NSW. Soil provides ecosystem services, enables plant growth, resists erosion, stores water, retains nutrients, and is a natural environmental buffer in the landscape. Healthy soil is the foundation of productive, sustainable agriculture. Managing for soil health allows producers to work with the land against impacts such as erosion, reduced water infiltration and/ or nutrient cycling. This Smart Farms Small Grants project will use new soil testing technology to fill gaps in soil science and improve landholder understanding of soil health best management practices through localised field day events. Experts from the NSW Soils Knowledge Network (SKN) and Soils Unit of NSW DPIE will ensure accurate advice, testing and soils data input into data systems such as eSPADE and/ or eDIRT deliver outcomes under the National Soil Strategy and improve resiliency of the working land.

Soils PET (People, Education, Technology) Pilot Project

Corridor Connectivity across the Little River Catchment

Current Project

Expressions of interest now open!

Many landholders residing in the catchment have established habitat corridors on their properties through the fencing off of remnant vegetation from grazing, restoration of riparian zones or planting of paddock trees. However, reduced rainfall trends over the past decade have degraded many of these patches, creating large gaps in vegetative habitat across the catchment (fragmentation). Decreased habitat, reduces gene flow of indigenous plants and animals. This can have large impacts on local ecosystems i.e. introduction of invasive species resulting in the decline of native populations, sometimes up to the level of extinction. The ‘Corridor Connectivity across the Little River Catchment’ project is a 2020-24 Central Tablelands DPI funded Project that supports the restoration of habitat. In an attempt to boost the presence of Endangered Ecological Communities (EEC) in Australia, seedlings from the Critically Endangered White Box Yellow Box Blakely’s Red Gum Grassy Woodland community have been sort. 

Photo credit: LRLG
Corridor Connectivity across the Little River Catchment

Containment Feeding as Natural Capital

Current Project

Expressions of interest now open!

Throughout 2017 -19, farmers in the Little River catchment experienced hard winters followed by high temperatures and low rainfall during summer and autumn; common characteristics of drought. Like all droughts, the highly variable climatic conditions had negative effects on farming systems e.g. vegetation diminished, reducing feed availability for livestock and healthy soil structure essential for water retention. Farmers were tasked with balancing pasture health and animal health to sustain profitability under the extreme conditions. To enhance landscape resilience across the catchment, LR, with funding support from the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment (Smart Farms, Small Grants), developed a project focusing on Containment Feeding (CF) as a means of Natural Capital during drought. 

Photo credit: DPI NSW
Containment Feeding as Natural Capital

Sustaining Science; School Education Program

Current Project

Science is the study of the world around us. It involves learning through observation, describing and experimenting. Throughout early childhood and adultescent years, curiosity about the world is a powerful catalyst for behaviour change. With appropriate guidance and education, children can integrate science into their everyday life and make informed decisions about how they use and respond to the environment around them. Funded in partnership with local Council (Cabonne Shire), the Sustaining Science, School Engagement Program involves tailored incursions focused on Natural Resource Management to Pre-school, Primary School and High School aged students. Considered the custodians of the land, fuelling student’s curiosity with up to date and relevant information is essential in ensuring we provide sustainable, healthy environments for future generations.

Photo credit: LRLG

Sustaining Science; School Education Program

Signposts; building our Community of Practice (CoP)

Current Project

LR hold quarterly Signposts events where members are invited to engage in joint activities and discussions around sustainable agriculture i.e. share techniques, experiences and/ or resources. Funded by LR, Signposts play an integral role in building a resilient Community of Practice where individuals come together through shared values and interests. Over the years’, LR have engaged multiple industry experts such as Paul Gibb, Local Land Services Senior Biosecurity officer, to participate in a variety of educational workshop. The Pest Management Workshop help in February 2020, triggered discussions around pest animal behaviour, species feeding and dispersal trends, best management practices and government assistance options. 

Photo credit: LRLG


Signposts; building our Community of Practice (CoP)

Hope through Habitat

Current Project

The term habitat summarises the array of resources (abiotic and biotic) that are present in an area. The resources available are essential to the survival and reproduction of a particular species located in that area. Habitats are characterized most often by climate and location. They can range from warm, moist areas such as rainforests or cold/ wet areas such as streams and rivers. The animals and plants that live in a particular habitat have adaptations that allow them to survive there. Habitat conservation is vital for protecting species and ecological processes. The Hope through Habitat project is a partnership project between LR and the Cumnock Men’s Shed. The project seeks to conserve, protect and restore local habitat to prevent loss of biodiversity. Developed in June 2021, the project has seen the installation of ten habitat boxes throughout the Baldry and Cumnock district. 

Photo credit: LRLG

Hope through Habitat

Quick posts; motivation through media

Current Project

Sharing knowledge through media platforms is a fast and effective way to accelerate change throughout communities. LR Quickposts are educational articles posted in the Yeoval Satellite and Cumnock Review each month. Each article focuses on a Natural Resource Management topic such as waste management, sustainable agriculture, biodiversity, water etc. The LR sponsored project started in Oct 2020 as a means of connecting the community with the organisation in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted social connections through the effects of lockdown, social distancing, face masks etc. The Quickposts make community connection easy and convenient and have the ability to sustain LR credibility through the provision of up to date, relevant and interesting content suitable to both local and regional audiences. 

Photo credit: LRLG

Quick posts; motivation through media

Closing the Loop at UPA

Current Project

Stage One of three complete!

LR was engaged by the Yeoval UPA Aged Care Services in October 2020, to support their efforts in natural resource management within the centre. The centre managed waste reduction through the Council owned co-mingled recycling service and wished to incorporate organics recycling into daily waste minimisation practices. Food and garden wastes are types of organics wastes (from plants or animals) that can biodegrade under optimal conditions. They are a valuable commodity, full of energy and nutrients that can be recycled back into the environment. Funding provided by LR will assist in the establishment of an organics recycling system within the centre. Infrastructure changes as well as education around sustainable activities that promote resource loss are key aspects of the projects success.  

Photo credit: Waste Management Review
Closing the Loop at UPA

Energetic Women in the Environment (EWE)

Current Project

    Engaging Women in the Environment is a bi-annual event which connects women from all areas (both residential and rural) parts of the LRLG district. Women make up approximately half of the international agriculture workforce and dominate a high proportion of essential “off-farm” work. Various studies into the importance of “off farm” activities such as community participation, alternative income support and technical efficiency among farm households indicate that the typically unrecognised form of work has a positive and significant effect on farming outputs.   The EWE project aims to facilitate communication and assist with increasing resilience within the LR catchment by bringing together women from across the LRLG district. Topics vary from gardening to business management with specialist knowledge available through guest speaker support. 

    Photo credit: LRLG 

    Energetic Women in the Environment (EWE)

    Organic Matter Matters

    Completed Project

    2018-2019

    A peer leaning project designed to improve land performance throughout the catchment by increasing soil organic carbon (SOC). In nature, SOC is lost from the soil during decomposition. Microorganisms essential for decomposition convert SOC to carbon dioxide (CO2) which is released into the atmosphere. Organic matter in the soil serves as a reservoir of nutrients and water, reduces compaction and increase water filtration. If not replenished, soil health degrades, reducing productivity, capability and resilience of the land. To increase soil quality assessment skills throughout the district, a recruitment group participated in a study tour to sites where soil was scientifically managed for increased organic matter. All participants contributed to an on ground experiment that developed their capacity to assess soil quality and ability to identify and implement effective management actions to increase SOC.

    Photo credit: LRLG

    Organic Matter Matters

    Exclusion Fencing Project

    Completed Project

    2018-2019

    A group of landholders in the Little River Catchment (The Goobang Cluster) share a common boundary with Goobang National Park. During a time of water scarcity, pest animals previously depended on the water sources located within the Park began sourcing water from neighbouring stocking troughs. Increased pressure from pigs, goats, deer, foxes, rabbits etc negatively impacted the clusters pasture and ground cover, resulting in erosion and excessive and sustained pressure due to lost potential of full stocking rates. The Goobang Cluster project successfully removed pest animal access to 4545 ha through exclusion fencing and a buffering zone of a further 3970 ha. By collaborating across the Goobang cluster boundary, landholders reduced the recovery periods associated with excessive pest animal grazing during drought, effectively enabling the cluster to match their stocking rates with their carrying capacity. 

    Photo credit: LRLG

    Exclusion Fencing Project

    Scattered Paddock Trees

    Completed Project

    2018-2019

    During 2018, LRLG received funding from Central Tablelands Local Land Services to stock proof fence 15 hollow bearing mature trees from the White Box, Yellow Box, Blakely’s Grassy Woodland Endangered Ecological Community (EEC). Erection of the stock proof fence around the remnant trees was no closer than the drip line around each tree to allow for effective rehabilitation around the tree base. To ensure safe passage of native animals, barbed wire was used sparingly and in all cases, plain wire was used for the top two and lowest fence strands. Modifications to an additional fence line enabled a further 10 trees on the same property (approximately 2ha) to be secured from grazing for a minimum of four years further enhancing rehabilitation of the EEC. 

    Photo credit: LRLG

    Scattered Paddock Trees

    Protecting the Purple Patch

    Completed Project

    2014-2016

    A $100,000 project that aimed to protect and enhance the waterway habitat of the endangered Purple Spotted Gudgeon. Evidence of the fish population was first noted in 2013 in a secondary tributary off the Little River. On ground restoration and rehabilitation works was funded through two grants from the NSW Environmental Trust and Landcare Australia. To increase community awareness of the species population within the district, a 1.5m x 1m statue was erected at the project site approximately, 10km South East of Yeoval, NSW.

    Photo credit: LRLG

    Protecting the Purple Patch

    CRIP - Local leaders

    Completed Project

    2013-2014

    Funded through the Dept. of justice this project aimed to build resilience capacity in regional communities pre and post disaster. Topics ranged from flood, fire & drought through to a social tragedy. The like-minded group formed and spent several days together work shopping and networking with Paul Ryan a leader in Resilience training over a period of 3 months. The group, now named LCRN (Local Community Resilience Network), provide support and education to community members at the annual Yeoval Show.

    Photo credit: LRLG 

    CRIP - Local leaders

    Rivers and Rocks

    Completed Project

    2012-2014

    A stock exclusion fencing, regeneration and revegetation project that aimed to increase landscape resilience through the fencing off of riparian zone banks. The Australian Government and Biodiversity Fund Program aided the instalment of 150km of stock exclusion fencing along the Buckinbah and Little River waterways. 75 alternative stock watering points where constructed on landholder properties to aid water accessibility for livestock and over 10,000ha of invasive species were managed through manual bush regeneration and/ or spraying practices. A number of community field days were held throughout the duration of the project with regular publications via the online Little River newsletter; the catchment catch up. 

    Photo credit: LRLG

    Rivers and Rocks